Blogophobia

Recently some students in my college journalism class brought me up short when they told me their information gathering on the internet lasted seconds, pills not even minutes. Journalists “in the making” no less. They said they had no patience to read online though they admitted the internet was their prime source of news and information. But it had to be brief!

What if information is complex and yet vital? And can’t easily be offered in capsule form? Prostate cancer information for instance is a perfect example. What I noticed of late is that the number of hits to this site has dropped off like a stone. My guess is that boomers who need this information are changing their reading habits, dosage imitating the X’ers. That got us to thinking. Our mission to help prostate patients manage their disorders remains the same, but we are aiming at moving targets: our readers. And we’ve been considering new ways to meet our mission: to help patients by delivering up-to-the minute analysis of prostate cancer advances so they can understand how they will affect their health. In other words, our goal is to bring readers the critical information they need to take care of their medical care. In short, to help them make intelligent decisions that will save lives.

If you have not scrolled on, please know we are considering new changes to this website that we hope will keep you tuned here for more than a nanosecond. And we also want you to read some sad and shocking facts. In 2014, more than 230,000 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Some 30,000 died from the disease.

Now, it’s true you can go online, type in “prostate cancer “ and in a few split seconds get more than 3 million hits on the subject. What’s also true is that a lot of that info will baffle you. You’ll read all about the latest stuff on robotic assisted prostatectomies and radiation wonder treatments that promise great outcomes and few side effects. But the number of unsubstantiated claims abound on the internet. And there is no real way for most patients to know what information is substantial and what is misleading or untrue. Even potentially harmful.

Our deal is to help patients make the all important life decisions. Our job is to help manage possible side effects of radiation therapies and radical prostatectomies as well as what to do if prostate cancer recurs.

There is no one-size-fits all prostate cancer treatment. The ability to make intelligent decisions requires knowledge of the disease. This blog and our book, taken together, are meant to provide that need and comfort.

 

To make an informed decision, in short, patients should read and educate themselves and spend time with their doctors to get all pertinent questions answered. We are here to help make that possible. Changes here are coming.