Testimonials:

Robert Sealey

Norman Morris, an award-winning writer/ producer, a news manager at CBS news (for 30 years), and a prostate cancer survivor, compiled this anthology. Twenty-two patients share their experiences, including Senator John Kerry and patients who have military, police, political, business or athletic leadership experience. This well-written, hopeful book teaches readers about prostate cancer symptoms, diagnostic tests, the risks and benefits of various treatments, prognoses, expectations for recovery and solutions to commonly-encountered problems.

After each account, Dr. A. Burnett, Professor of Urology at Hopkins Medical School, and a leading authority on prostate cancer, offers his feedback as a cancer-care professional. Dr. Burnett shows obvious concern for the welfare of patients and readers as he briefly reviews each case, points out the lessons learned, explains why particular solutions helped each patient while sharing his clinical experiences as a urologist seeing patients with prostate cancer. Time after time, Dr. Burnett recommends that patients read, learn, and get second opinions before deciding what to do about their diagnoses. Many of these stories explain that patients found it helpful to read and then see one or more specialists after consulting their first urologist.

Nothing gets sugar-coated. The facts are clear. Prostate cancer is a serious medical problem; most men fear this diagnosis. Even so, this book respects patients, families and readers by outlining the procedures for diagnosis and the options for treatment, reviewing the risks and benefits and discussing the concerns, issues and problems which often arise after a diagnosis of prostate cancer. These inspiring survivor stories teach readers how 22 patients found quality care and lived well with their prostate cancers.

If you or a loved one have prostate cancer, this book will educate, support and encourage you.

- Robert Sealey, BSc, CA – SEAR Publications

Bill Moyers

When Norman Morris and I worked side-by-side at CBS News, his passion for firsthand reporting fired my own enthusiasm and buoyed my own work. Now he has brought to the life and death battle against prostate cancer that same powerful instinct for first-person testimony. Good journalism is an early-warning system for the health of democracy and our own well-being and every man who reads this book will thank his lucky stars for it.

- Bill Moyers, PBS

Bob Schieffer

As a bladder cancer survivor, I know firsthand how hard it is for men to talk about their diseases—especially below-the-belt diseases—but this book shows us how to do just that, the first step in coping with and eventually conquering any disease. Needed, helpful and at times inspirational.

- Bob Schieffer, CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent

Washington Post

Washington Post   4/6/2010

PROSTATE CANCER

Survivors’ stories

“Prostate Cancer Survivors Speak Their Minds” (John Wiley & Sons, $16.95)

Kudos to the men — celebrities and normal folk alike — who share their experiences with prostate cancer in this book, co-written by CBS News journalist Norman S. Morris and his doctor, urologist Arthur L. Burnett II. Contributors include athletes Arnold Palmer, Ken Griffey Sr. and Robin Cole. Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) writes in the foreword that the diagnosis was “like a swift kick to the midsection” but that he was lucky to have access to “the best health care on earth.” Kerry and others point out that prostate cancer does not strike all men equally — African American men have the highest rates of contracting the disease and their death rates are 2.4 times higher than white men’s, according to the book.

– Rachel Saslow

Richard Meyer

Interviewee’s Review

This book is a “must read” for any man diagnosed with Prostate Cancer and should be on the reading list of all men over 40.  The stories told, including mine, give the reader a thorough insight of monitoring required, planning needed, challenges to be expected and the commitment required by patient and surgeon to “beat” this disease.

Norman Morris and Dr. Burnett have laid out the facts openly (good and bad) and have provided meaningful advice, information and good common sense direction.

Read this book! You will be much more informed about Prostate Cancer and what men need to do and know about this too often unrecognized but serious health issue for all men.

- Richard E. Meyer – Vice President, First Trust Bank, Conshohocken, Pennsylvania

Montclair Times

The Montclair Times   Thursday April 1, 2010

Writing has almost always been a collaborative thing for Norman Morris; for much of his career as a producer and manager at CBS News, he put words in other people’s mouths, writing the news reports that were delivered by Dallas Townsend, Douglas Edwards and other big newsmen of the 20th century.

Harry Reasoner and Walter Cronkite asked him to write the essays they read on air as their own, and he wrote in their voices, in their vocabularies, using as many words as each of them could say in the allotted time.

He has just published a book that sprang from his need to say something in his own voice.  But one voice wasn’t enough for what he needed the book to say.

The book is “Prostate Cancer Survivors Speak Their Minds.”  His surgeon, Dr. Arthur Burnett II, director of the Male Consultation Clinic at Johns Hopkins, signed on as co-author from the beginning.  Morris calls it “a support group in print.”

In four sections–Diagnosis and Coming to Terms, Considering Options and Treatments, Warnings and Conflicts, and Aftereffects–Morris and 20 men he interviewed talk about living through prostate cancer.

Morris will be at Watchung Booksellers tonight to talk about his book and sign copies.

A self-described mama’s boy, Morris was drafted during the Korean War, and calls the Marines the best thing that ever happened to him.

As an “independent thinking person,” he couldn’t stand the regimentation, he said, “but what I got out of it was this resourcefulness they implant in you.”

Ever since, no mater what the challenge, Morris said, he has translated “Take that hill” into “do what everybody thinks is impossible.”

The other thing the Marines taught Morris was that “you never leave a guy behind. That’s true in everything you do in life.”

So, having survived prostate cancer, Morris was determined to help others, an impulse he shared with Sen. John Kerry, who wrote the foreword.

“John Kerry and I had the same feeling: once we got over our cancers; we had an obligation to help everybody else. It became a mission,” Morris said.

Dr. Burnett made the selection of patients based on their medical issues, and provided a commentary on each of Morris’s interviews.

Morris was told it would be hard to sell their book unless they had celebrities in it. Celebrities weren’t eager to talk about prostate cancer, but athletes are used to discussing their bodies, and among the men he interviewed are Arnold Palmer, Ken Griffey Sr and Robin Cole.

Other contributors include the publisher Earl G. Graves Sr (of Black Enterprise magazine) whose chapter is titled “Stern Advice to Young African American Men: Listen Up!”

Asked what readers should take from his book, Morris said,”The important thing is to find the best doctor you can find and the best hospital you can find.

“Pick a doctor based on his skill, whether it’s radiation, surgery, or whatever.  It isn’t the technique that’s important. It’s the skill of the guy who’s operating on you ( or treating you ) that counts. If there’s a question, you get a second opinion.”

- By Elizabeth Oguss of the Montclair Times

South Bend Tribune

Prostate cancer survivors sound off in book

Kudos to the men–celebrities and normal folk alike–who share their experiences with prostate cancer in the book “Prostate Cancer Survivors Speak Their Minds” (John Wiley & Sons) co-written by CBS News journalist Norman S. Morris and his doctor,urologist Arthur L. Burnett II.

Contributors include athletes Arnold Palmer, Ken Griffey Sr and Robin Cole, according to The Washington Post.  Sen. John F. Kerry, D-Mass., writes in the foreword that the diagnosis was ” like a swift kick to the midsection” but that he was lucky to have access to “the best health care on earth.”

Kerry and others point out that prostate cancer does not strike all men equally–African-American men have the highest rates of contracting the disease and their death rates are 2.4 times higher than white men’s, according to the book.

- South Bend Tribune.com April 13, 2010

Nisha Jackson

Thank you, Mr. Morris, for being on our show. Your story was inspiring and captivating.  I am sure it spoke strongly to our listeners. Thank you!  Nisha

- Nisha Jackson, host of syndicated radio broadcast Just Ask Nish, Medford, Oregon July 25, 2010

Available At These Locations

Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Click on a store to Purchase Online

Hippocrates

~ Father of Medicine